Nathan’s Bookshelf: Winter 2015

Most of my recent blog posts have been focused on topics related to internet marketing, since that’s where my head’s been lately.

But today I’d like to take a step back and remind my loyal readers and stray visitors that I’m not simply an internet marketing automaton…

I do have other interests…

And reading is one of those interests.

So if you’re also a reader of books and you’re looking to curl up with a good book by the radiator this winter, have a gander at my bookshelf…

And if you see something you like – by all means, click on those affiliate links ;)

What’s on Nathan’s Bookshelf Right Now

The actual blurry photo of my bookshelf that I took with my Samsung Galaxy S5 copy that was made in Hong Kong and bought in Bangkok

The actual blurry photo I took with my Samsung Galaxy S5 copy that was made in Hong Kong and bought in Bangkok

This is a mere fraction of my collection, but here goes:

  • Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson, by G.I. Gurdjieff – Anyone who knows me knows I’m a huge fan of Gurdjieff. This is the first book in his trilogy. If you are considering reading this book, all I have to say is, “Good luck…”
  • In Search of the Miraculous, by P.D. Ouspensky – Anyone interested in learning more about Gurdjieff should start with this book.
  • The Storymatic, by The Storymatic – This isn’t actually a book, it’s a set of cards. But it’s right there in the picture so I figured I’d throw it in. It’s a set of cards that are designed to help stimulate the creative writer’s brain. I wrote about them in a previous blog post. It doesn’t look like the edition I bought is still on Amazon, but there are a couple others…
  • William Blake: The Complete Illuminated Books, by William Blake – A must-have for any student of Blake. Reading the full-color reproductions of his prophetic works is a completely different experience than reading the text versions.
  • Austin Osman Spare books – Spare is another major player in the Western esoteric scene. His unreal work was heavily influenced by the likes of Dante, Goethe, Lao Tsu, and more.
  • The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Direct Marketing, by Bob Bly – This book looks like it’s only available used, but it’s a great resource for anyone interested in direct mail marketing. It’s written in the well-known Bly style: clear, concise, to-the-point.
  • Dictionary of the Khazars, by Milorad Pavic – Someone said of him, “He thinks like other people dream,” or something very close. Read a page of any Pavic book and you’ll see why. If you love crazy surrealistic poetry, get this book.
  • The Journal of Albion Moonlight, by Kenneth Patchen – Another surrealist poet, Patchen makes the beatnicks look like mice. This book is a difficult read, but it will take your mind apart.
  • The Works of Lord Byron, by Lord Byron – Yawn. Got it for a few bucks secondhand. May use it to start a fire if it gets cold enough.
  • The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing, by Thomas S. Kane – I brought this all the way back from Thailand. It’s interesting. I feel it could be useful if I had enough time to go through and create exercises from parts of it.
  • Rumi’s Stuff, by Rumi – I can’t read the title from this picture (I’m writing this post at the office), but I think it’s the popular “selected works” one. Rumi’s another great addition to any poetry lover’s bookshelf.
  • Viriconium, by M. John Harrison – Harrison is one of the best living writers. The first Viriconium book was fantastic, as are Harrison’s more recent works. My favorites are Light and The Course of the Heart.
  • Wired for Story, by Lisa Cron – Like to write? Then read this. She sheds scientific light on the story-writing process, but it’s more about story than it is about wired.
  • A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters, by Kenneth Henshall – This fascinating, in-depth look at the etymology of Japanese characters is a must-own for anyone deeply interested in the Japanese language.
  • Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandha, by Swami Satyananda Saraswati – My favorite book on yoga. It provides a complete series of asanas (yoga poses), benefits, counter-poses, et cetera et cetera.
  • William Blake Dictionary, by S. Foster Damon – A must-have for any serious student of Blake. It provides detailed explanations for all the major concepts and characters found in Blake’s work.
  • Japanese Verbs and Essentials of Grammar, by Rita Lampkin – This short grammar book contains everything you need to know to create grammatically correct sentences. I taught myself grammar with this book when I was 15.
  • Hinduism, by Somebody – I don’t know if the linked-to book is the same one that’s on my shelf or not…I’m reading the Mahabarata right now and bought a book on Hinduism to help me out with some of the concepts.
  • The Ultimate Marketing Plan, by Dan S. Kennedy – Kennedy is great. His books are like sales and marketing textbooks. Must-haves for small businesses or anyone in sales and marketing…like me. This one covers Dan’s “marketing triangle”: message-media-market.
  • The Ultimate Sales Letter, by Dan S. Kennedy – A must for anyone who ever does copywriting or who plans on writing a sales letter.
  • Light on Yoga, by B.K.S. Iyengar – This is another classic book on yoga. Any serious or semi-serious yoga student should have this on the shelf.

 

As mentioned, this list of books doesn’t even cover a fraction of my total collection.

Maybe when I have access to the rest of my books I’ll put them up…

Well, that about does it for this edition of Nathan’s blog…

We’ll see you guys next time!